Tag Archive | Music Ministry Job Descriptions

Job Description – Men’s Fellowship Director

Job Description – Men’s Fellowship Director
Bro. Ted White
United Pentecostal Church – 1989

Job Purpose

To administer and motivate the Men’s Fellowship Department in a manner that will result in growth, maturity and stability of the men of the church. Major focus will be placed on organizing Spiritual, Social, and Family oriented programs for the men of the church. In focusing upon these, you will accomplish the main task of the Men’s Fellowship department which is to build leaders that God can use for his kingdom.

Job Qualifications

1. Must be filled with the Holy Ghost.
2. Must meet the qualifications for church membership.
3. Must be loyal to the Pastor.
4. Must be willing to work in harmony with others.
5. Must carry a burden for the Men’s Fellowship Ministry.
6. Must be able to instill enthusiasm and excitement.
7. Must be able to lead and motivate others.
8. Must be a lover of the souls of Men.
9. Must be faithful and dependable in accomplishing duties.
10. Must have a stable walk with God.

Job Responsibilities

** Shall oversee and supervise all operations of the Men’s Fellowship Department under the direction of the Pastor. Shall seek to implement all given duties with tact, zeal, and love.

** Shall oversee and supervise the Men’s Prayer meeting to be held monthly.
a. Shall work with the Pastor in developing a plan to promote and encourage attendance to the Men’s Prayer meeting.

** Shall coordinate all projects and activities that are undertaken by the Men’s Fellowship (Fundraising, Outings, Church Projects, etc.)

** Shall work with the Pastor to plan several men’s outings during the year to help strengthen the unity of the men and provide opportunity for them to invite an unsaved friend.
a. Suggestions: camping, fishing, canoeing, rafting, hunting, backpacking, etc.

** Shall work with the Maintenance Department to schedule periodic Work Days on Saturdays to keep the facility in good repair.

** Shall schedule occasional Men’s Prayer Breakfasts to be accompanied with solid instruction on the responsibilities of men in the church. All instruction will be provided or approved by
the Pastor.

** Shall work with the Pastor and Ladies Auxiliary to plan an annual Family and Marriage Week.

** Shall organize and promote an annual Father-Son barbecue or campout. To include an “Adopt-a-Son” program for those with out sons/fathers.

** Shall work closely with the New Convert Care ministry to involve all new convert men in the activities and programs of Men’s Fellowship. Should make a special effort to insure that all new
convert men have a special invitation from you for all activities.

** Shall work with the Pastor to encourage a “Family Devotion” time within each family possible. Shall promote Family Devotions within the church by all available means.

** Shall be responsible for keeping the Pastor informed and obtaining permission when necessary as to dates and projects of the Men’s Fellowship.

Other Duties

** Shall work with the Pastor to select an assistant to help you in all aspects of your departmental duties.

** Shall endeavor to not schedule any departmental activities on Monday night. Monday will be known as “Family Night” and all church members are encouraged to stay home with their families on this night.

** Shall be an example to the church in soulwinning by being continually involved in the Home Bible Study Ministry, or some other form of outreach ministry.

** Shall be an example to the church in faithfulness by attending all church services and functions.

** Shall be an example to the church in spiritual growth by coming at least one-half hour before each service to pray.

** Shall attend all Annual Planning Retreats and Monthly Departmental Planning Councils.

** If unable to attend because of an emergency, shall inform the Pastor in advance and have a substitute attend in your place.

** Shall hand in an official monthly report at the Monthly Staff Council.

** Shall perform additional duties as required.

Organizational Relationships

The Men’s Fellowship Director is responsible directly to the Pastor. Each year, the Pastor and Men’s Fellowship Director will review this Job Description, update and improve to make more applicable to the position. Accountability shall consist of a monthly report of all activities and upcoming events. The director shall be responsibility for all interdepartmental staff and personnel.

The director shall work closely with all departments, but especially with Ladies Auxiliary and Maintenance. Evaluation of performance of this position shall be performed by the Pastor on an annual basis. The term of this office shall be for one year.

Training and Development

** Read “The Christian Manhood Manual” By Dr. Dave Hyles (Sword of the Lord)
** Read “Maximized Manhood” by Edwin L. Cole (Whitaker House)
** Read “The Measure of a Man” by Gene A. Getz (Regal Books)
** Read “Let My People Grow” by Tim Massengale (Revival Research)
** Read additional book(s) provided by Pastor

Job Goals For The Year Of 1988

** Schedule several men’s outings. Emphasis on bringing unsaved visitors.
** Assist in the planning of Family and Marriage Seminar.
** Develop a plan to promote and encourage Family Devotions.
** Schedule periodic Saturday Men’s Prayer Breakfasts and Training.
** Plan Quarterly Men’s Work Days with the Maintenance Department.
** Organize annual Father-son barbecue or campout.
** Develop Job Descriptions for all interdepartmental positions.

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5 Smart Ways to Recruit Church Tech Volunteers

5 Smart Ways to Recruit Church Tech Volunteers
Cathy Hutchison

If you want to recruit great volunteers and have some to spare, consider using these methods to shift your volunteer strategy from point-of-need to pipeline.

You just found out your audio mixer is moving. To Australia.

And your lighting tech just had a baby at the same time your backup lighting tech is pulling too many hours at his day job to help.

There are lots of reasons that volunteers leave. (Usually unexpected and at the worst possible time.

… volunteers are rarely plug-and-play. They need training-which is why the unexpected vacancies produce so much stress for church tech teams.

And every time it happens, there is a scramble to fill the gap. Usually after a bit of negotiating in the hopes there might be some way the volunteer will stay.

Ugh. Recruiting.

It’s a necessary part of every tech director’s skill set,yet finding volunteers at the point when you need them is a stressful set up. After all, volunteers are rarely plug-and-play. They need training-which is why the unexpected vacancies produce so much stress for church tech teams.

Creating regular systems for recruiting that happen on an ongoing basis, moves you from scrambling to meet a need to producing a pipeline of volunteers. It’s an effective way to build a sustainable volunteer base.

Here are five systems you might set up to build your volunteer pipeline:

1-Become part of the onboarding process
Most churches have an onboarding process that helps new members connect into ministries they are interested in. While technical arts is probably already a check box on the new member interest card, there is an opportunity to take it a step further. What if part of the onboarding process was an introduction to the technical arts ministry? After all, it’s already highly visible on a Sunday morning. Having tech arts own a section of the onboarding education helps people see what it takes to create a Sunday morning in a more tangible way than a PowerPoint slide can deliver.

2-Host a quarterly check-it-out lunch
Surprisingly, people with an interest in technical arts can often be intimidated by a well-established crew. When you are the new kid on the block, it can feel that everyone has more training than you do. Even people who work in production may feel that their skills won’t be a match.

… when First Baptist Dallas surveyed its tech volunteers to find out how they got involved in the ministry, they learned that the majority had first connected via the lunch.
Setting up a regular, convenient, low-key event like a lunch can help you meet those who are interested without the intimidation factor. In fact, when First Baptist Dallas surveyed its tech volunteers to find out how they got involved in the ministry, they learned that the majority had first connected via the lunch.

3-Get the high school kids involved
Many church technical leaders had their interest sparked in technical ministry through experience they gained in high school.

Designing youth spaces with oversized booths so there is the ability to shadow, in addition to creating opportunities for youth to run their own tech, builds skills and interest. For many, it ignites a passion that lasts their whole lives.

4-Create internships
Companies often fill their entry-level positions by building strong relationships with universities. By creating internships, you get to pour into people who aren’t even connected to your church yet. And, you can specialize beyond theatre and broadcast, creating internships for film, stage management, or graphic design.
It is worth reaching out to your local university to find out what types of internships would benefit their students.

5-Leverage #FOMO
Building a team with great culture often results in people inviting their friends, but many times people don’t think to ask.

When you have recruiting systems in place, you start to build pipelines. Not only do you have a full crew of volunteers, but there are also people on deck.

Creating “fear of missing out” takes a little bit of intention on the part of the tech leader. When you fill your personal social media feed with behind-the-scenes shots and tag the crew, it shows people in their friend feed what they are involved in. And because you are working in production, it not only looks fun, it also looks cool. Create the #FOMO.

When you have recruiting systems in place, you start to build pipelines. Not only do you have a full crew of volunteers, but there are also people on deck.

So, when your video tech wins the lottery and decides to move to Bali, you don’t stress. You have bench.

 

The above article, “5 Smart Ways to Recruit Church Tech Volunteers” was written by Cathy Hutchison. The article was excerpted from https://www.churchproduction.com/.

The material is copyrighted and should not be reprinted under any other name or author. However, this material may be freely used for personal study or research purposes.

This article may not be written by an Apostolic author, but it contains many excellent principles and concepts that can be adapted to most churches. As the old saying goes, “Eat the meat. Throw away the bones.”

Posted in AIS File Library, JD - Job Descriptions, MU - Music Ministry, MUGE - Music Ministry, MUMA - Music Management0 Comments

How to Mic Right

How to Mic Right
Andy McDonough

Experts estimate that as much as a remarkable 30% of overall sound quality can be attributed to the proper selection and position of the microphones on stage. So when it comes to mic-ing drums and instruments, it pays to get it right.

When worship musicians are giving their all, it’s the audio engineer’s job to capture that great sound and energy in the mix. However, as anyone who has tried can tell you, it’s not as easy as just putting up a few microphones. Even if a church is lucky enough to have great players, quality audio gear and a good acoustic space in which to worship, there are many things as a knowledgeable engineer can do to improve the sound. Experts estimate that as much as a remarkable 30% of overall sound quality can be attributed to the proper selection and position of the microphones on stage. As a result, what an engineer knows about microphones and the care taken to place them for proper instrument mic-ing can separate a good mix from a great one.

As much 30% of overall sound quality can be attributed to the proper selection and position of the microphones on stage.

David Walters is the media director at Chapel Hill Bible Church in Chapel Hill, N.C. With over 10 years of experience in worship audio, sound engineering for video productions, and recording, Walters says that while understanding the basics of mic-ing instruments in the studio is a good starting point, the worship environment presents some unique challenges for audio engineers.

“In a perfect world, you would do in church just what you would do in the studio to get great sound,” he says, “but the reality is different. In a studio situation, you typically have lots of time and control. Whereas, in a worship situation you have all of the challenges found with live sound, like trying to isolate instruments and preventing feedback, but you may only have an hour to get ready-if you are lucky.”

When preparing volunteers to help him engineer audio, Walters advises them to learn about the technology first. “Your personal experience will ultimately be your guide, but you can find a wealth of information about mics and mic-ing techniques,” he says. “Learn about how microphones work, polar patterns, characteristics and options selection. Then, get out some mics and really listen to them in different situations.”

How to Mic Right
Experts estimate that as much as a remarkable 30% of overall sound quality can be attributed to the proper selection and position of the microphones on stage. So when it comes to mic-ing drums and instruments, it pays to get it right.

Finding the right mic
Audio pros have an old adage, “While some mics can work well for many applications, no single mic will be great on everything.” Since one mic won’t address all the issues an engineer is likely to find on stage, it’s important to know something about the characteristics of different types of microphones, as well as have a good selection of mics with different diaphragm types, polar patterns, and sensitivity.

Exceptionally good microphones can be exceptionally expensive, but that doesn’t mean your church needs a vault of expensive microphones. Walters reminds his volunteers that it’s not all about how expensive your microphones are. In his estimation, “The appropriate choice and good placement of an affordable mic will always beat out an expensive mic in the wrong place,” David Walters, Media Director, Chapel Hill Bible Church, Chapel Hill, NC.

For Walters, finding just the right mic has a lot to do with what role the instrument will play in the mix. “The challenge is to find the mic in your microphone closet that is best suited to the source and how it will work in the mix,” he says.

Walter relies heavily on the industry favorites, Shure SM57 dynamic microphones and Shure KSM137 condenser microphones. He uses SM57s for close-up work, like guitar amps and snare drums, and the KSM137s for situations that require a broader reach and different qualities, such as deployed in an X-Y configuration over a string section or as a supplemental mic added to a lead or featured acoustic player. “These are my ‘go to’ mics,” he says. “They are affordable, reliable, and each can work well for many different situations.”

For drum sounds, Walters has faced the common challenges for worship of maintaining reasonable stage volume, dealing with a reflective room, and having mix multiple sets of instrumentalists, including four drummers. “Drums are frequently the most distinctive sound on recordings,” he notes, “so well worth our attention to mic up correctly.”

To help offset his very live room and eliminate ringing, Walters first tunes his drums down and, where necessary, dampens the heads with gel. He has permanently mounted a popular kick drum mic, the AKG-D112, in the bass drum and 3-4 inches from the beater head. The D112 is another affordable and very durable large-diaphragm cardioid dynamic mic often used for kick or bass drum. Major considerations that narrow down the field for bass drum mics is a mic’s ability to handle high sound pressure and its response at bass drum frequencies. By installing his D112 inside the drum, rather than placing it each time, Walters has guaranteed that its position never changes, and plus it saves valuable time during Sunday morning setups.

Walters appreciates the convenience and great sound produced by Shure Beta 56a instrument mics that clip directly to the rim of the toms at an angle that allows for couple of inches of “play” for making adjustments. For a realistic snare sound, he relies on a single Shure SM57 placed at the top of the snare five inches over the rim angled towards the center of the head.
“Every mic-ing situation is different and requires some experimentation,” Rich Mace, Technical Services Director, First Baptist Church, Sevierville, TN.

When training his audio volunteers, Walters suggests they personally explore the characteristics of the microphones available. “I tell them to pic a microphone and listen to them with headphones through a portable recorder,” he says. “Listen to how different mics sound in different situations and you’ll have some great experience to apply when you need to mic up an instrument.”

After volunteers have learned about microphone types and their characteristics, Rich Mace, technical services director at First Baptist Church in Sevierville, Tenn., asks them to consider what role the instrument being mic-ed will play in the mix. “Once you understand how the instrument will be used,” he offers, “you can better choose a microphone that will complement or emphasize that sound. That becomes your starting point to ‘build’ a good mix.”

Basics of Mic Placement
Along with having the right microphone for the source you hope to capture, mic placement is critical to getting a good sound. Let’s contemplate another old adage, this one specific to microphone placement, “The best mic position cannot be predicted, it must be found.” That explains why audio professionals frequently start with mics they know in a place that they know has worked in the past. However, it’s important to understand that where the mic is placed in relation to the source and considering other factors on stage is critical to capturing a good sound. An engineer must always be prepared to experiment to some degree with the placement since every situation is different.

“Drums are frequently the most distinctive sound on recordings, so well worth our attention to mic up correctly.” -David Walters, Media Director, Chapel Hill Bible Church, Chapel Hill, NC.
Mace, who has worked with audio for worship for over 30 years, has gained much of his experience working the concert halls, theaters and theme parks in and around Pigeon Forge, Tenn. “Being so close to Nashville and some wonderful venues means that we have many talented musicians, as well as many experienced audio engineers,” he notes.

As a result, Mace describes much of his audio engineering education, including his practical knowledge of mic choice and placement, as a collaboration or “partnership” with his players and peers. “I want all the players to be happy with their sound,” he says, “and working closely with them gives us the best possible result.”

In addition to presenting challenges of mic-ing large ensembles, including horns and orchestral instruments, the three Sunday morning services at First Baptist Church Sevierville reflect three different worship styles: traditional with organ and choir, modern, and blended. Having to cover a wide variety of styles is a frequent challenge for audio engineers in worship environments. According to Mace, attention to proper mic-ing, and especially mic placement with acoustic instruments, is critical to keeping the overall mix in tune with the worship style.

Like many audio veterans, Mace leverages the advantages of Shure SM57s for close mic-ing situations placing them as close as possible and at various angles to the source or “off axis”, for the best sound on electric guitars. But according to Mace, every mic-ing situation is different and requires some experimentation. For his blended service with brass, he uses Shure KSM137 condensers for the trumpets and he recently found that a pair of AKG Perception 200 large diaphragm condensers were the right choice for his for trombone and sax section. The mics were not being used and had remained stored away in the church’s equipment closet until Mace decided to give them a try. “Don’t be afraid to try whatever you have available,” he says. “The result of a different mic and careful placement will often surprise you.”

For a good final mix, it’s important to get it right at the start by listening to the result each time you place a mic.

Mace recently upgraded the church’s drum microphones with an Audix drum pack that includes two D2 mics clipped to toms, a D4 clipped to the floor tom, and an I5 for snare placed above and angled towards the center of the snare head. A D6 bass drum mic was mounted on floor stand just outside the hole of the front head. Mic-ing a kick drum at the hole and just on the outer side of the front head is often considered to be the best placement for a solid, low-end kick drum sound. Here, the level of sub and lows are represented the most, but you need to be careful of “bleed” from the cymbals and snare drum. A microphone placed inside the kick drum will get more punchy and natural sound while reducing the risk of “bleed” from the rest of the kit. Which mic-ing option is best is the one that best fits your worship style. “The Audix drum mics we added were affordable and made a huge difference in the drum sounds for both our worship and recording,” says Mace.

First Baptist Church has also upgraded the grand piano sound for all the services with a a pair of DPA d:vote 4099 mics with the low end mic angled midway down the sounding board and the high end mic pointed straight on and closer to the hammers. “The piano now has a big tone and an overall cleaner sound,” Mace notes. “Plus, this mic-ing reacts well to different players which is always a consideration in worship environments.”

A Common Mistake
Both Walters and Mace agree that an all too common mistake by inexperienced audio engineers is thinking that microphones can be effectively be placed simply by sight. Experts know that they can get close with experience, but proper mic placement requires listening because of all the variables at play, including the player’s style and tone choices that day, changes in location or level of other sources on stage, and other dynamic factors. Microphones are also in a critical spot, being at very start of the audio signal path. For a good final mix, it’s important to get it right at the start by listening to the result each time you place a mic.

Mace credits his collaboration with others with greatly increasing his knowledge and ability to effectively mic instruments. “Everyone has different experience to offer,” he says. “You can learn a lot from other engineers in the worship and entertainment communities. Reach out, do lots of research, listen, and don’t be afraid to try something new. A different mic or a slight change in its placement can make a huge difference in the overall mix and the quality of your worship sound.”

 

Andy McDonough is a freelance writer, photographer, musician, educator and consulting engineer based in Middleton, N.J. Among his favorite topics?the application of technology and music in houses of worship. He welcomes email at andymcd@comcast.net.

The above article, “How to Mic Right” was written by Andy McDonough. The article was excerpted from https://www.churchproduction.com.

The material is copyrighted and should not be reprinted under any other name or author. However, this material may be freely used for personal study or research purposes.

This article may not be written by an Apostolic author, but it contains many excellent principles and concepts that can be adapted to most churches. As the old saying goes, “Eat the meat. Throw away the bones.”

Posted in AIS File Library, JD - Job Descriptions, MU - Music Ministry, MUGE - Music Ministry, MUMA - Music Management0 Comments

How to Have a Great Week as a Worship Pastor

How to Have a Great Week as a Worship Pastor
David Santistevan

OK, Worship Pastors. Let’s get real. Have you ever had to explain what you do?

Have you ever had to answer a random stranger the question of what you do for a living? You can’t just say, “I’m a worship pastor.” Because that doesn’t make sense.

Unless you’re a church person, you’ll have no idea what that means. Typically that question is answered with, “I’m a music pastor. I lead worship. I oversee the music in my church. But it’s more than just a Sunday job. There’s a lot of other things I do too.”

I could go on and on. It’s a long answer.

But what do we actually do? Of course, this post isn’t about explaining ourselves. I simply want to help you have a good week.

Oftentimes we live in two different extremes. On one side we’re planning, dreaming, brainstorming the future. We want to break new ground. Stay ahead of the curve. Anticipate what’s coming next. Many of us are there. But many of us are also buried, drowning in the sea of mundane maintenance. We’re not inspired. We’re not advancing. We’re just getting by.

You may even be asking the question, “Am I supposed to be here?”

But what if you could engineer a great week? What if you could plan a week that was filled with real, genuine ministry? Not just tasks, todo’s, and endless busy work. It’s possible. It just takes some advanced planning and a resilience to keep at it.

Do you remember what the Bible says about ministry?

And he gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the shepherds and teachers to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ.

We are not here for ourselves. We are not here to simply be busy. We are here to equip.

5 Ways to Have a Great Week as a Worship Pastor

Here we go.

1.Make Phone Calls – Email and text messages have overtaken our lives. Yes, they’re more convenient. Yes, it’s easier to get an answer. But a phone call goes the distance. You’ll never know how effective a phone call can be in someone’s life. Look at your team roster and call people randomly. No agenda. Just to thank them for serving and to pray for them. Simple, but so effective.

2. Develop Someone – Who are you going to develop this week? Who are you going to pour yourself into? This needs to be a main agenda for every week. Maybe you feel threatened by more talented team members. Maybe you fear someone will take your place. The truth is, the most important and effective Worship Pastors are those who develop others. You won’t be known for the strength of your talent but the strength of the team underneath you.

3. Connect With Your Lead Pastor – Be proactive. Don’t wait. Plan how you’ll serve your Pastor. Think through the weekend services before he comes to you. Corporate worship isn’t a place to do what you want. It’s a place to serve a local body and the vision of your Pastor. The better you serve the vision, the more you connect, the more he or she will trust you with your vision.

4. Expand Your Team – How will your team grow this week? What steps can you take to build connections with people and grow your team? There is an ebb and flow to church life. There are seasons where you may not “need” musicians. But if you know anything about ministry, you know those times don’t last long. Always create context for more involvement. Keep the door open for new disciples.

5. Spend Time With Jesus – I know that’s an answer everyone knows. It’s common sense. But if you’re ministry doesn’t flow from a living reality in Christ, it won’t work. This isn’t a profession. It’s a calling. This isn’t a good career move. It’s a commission. Always be moved by Jesus. Keep your heart in a soft place. Stay close to your Bible.

The above article, “How to Have a Great Week as a Worship Pastor” was written by David Santistevan. The article was excerpted from http://www.davidsantistevan.com/worship-pastor-week/.

The material is copyrighted and should not be reprinted under any other name or author. However, this material may be freely used for personal study or research purposes.

This article may not be written by an Apostolic author, but it contains many excellent principles and concepts that can be adapted to most churches. As the old saying goes, “Eat the meat. Throw away the bones.”

Posted in AIS File Library, JD - Job Descriptions, MU - Music Ministry, MUGE - Music Ministry, MUMA - Music Management0 Comments

3 Ways Every Worship Leader Can Help the Pastor Win

3 Ways Every Worship Leader Can Help the Pastor Win
Mike Harland

Somewhere along the way I learned my responsibility in a worship service was much broader than just leading the music. I came to understand I had other roles that were critical in helping the pastor win every week. A pastor that can focus on the preaching event and the awesome shepherding responsibility to his congregation will be more effective than the one who has to worry about how the service will go.

Here are three easy ways that everyone leading worship can help their pastor.

No Surprises

Nothing can throw off a pastor’s mindset in a worship service faster than something unexpected happening in the service. Find a way to make sure every aspect of the plan is available to the pastor ahead of time. Over time, he may trust you with this. Don’t ever violate that trust.

Occasionally, a church wants to surprise the pastor – perhaps on his birthday or anniversary. If you know the pastor so well that you can predict his response, trust your judgement. If not, ask his wife confidentially how he might respond to a surprise in the service. Carefully think about anything that would feel like a surprise. If in doubt about anything, don’t do it. Just don’t.

Keeper of the Clock

He has prayed and prepared all week. He has something burning in his heart that he is convinced God wants him to say. Then, a 10-minute testimony leading up to a song takes the wind right out of his sails. Now, the whole sermon feels rushed and he may not even get to the point he was convinced God put in his heart for the church.

The Worship Leader has got to fight for those minutes on his pastor’s behalf. It may take time to get there, but a worship leader can create a culture where everyone is sensitive to the pastor’s time. Why force the pastor to be a bully and fight for it? The worship leader can protect it on his behalf.

I’ve cut many songs on the fly to protect my pastor’s time. And if someone on the team couldn’t be trusted with time, they would lose the opportunity to serve until they could be trusted.

The Pastor’s Concierge

Does he need water? Has the battery in his lapel been refreshed? Is there a person who has him “trapped” in an unnecessary pre-service conversation that I can help him wrap up? Does he have a copy of the worship folder? Is there a visual in his message that I can double-check for him? It’s an infinite list.

Or, one of my personal favorites – can I take care of his Bible? I loved going up to my pastor at the end of the service when people were lining up to speak to him or when he was about to go into a time of counseling with someone who had responded that morning and say, “Let me have your Bible, Pastor.” I would either put it in his office or hand it back to him a little later.

The principle is this – find little and seemingly insignificant ways to serve his personal needs before and after the service. Over time, it will send the clear and sure signal that you are there to serve him and to help him with the overwhelming responsibility of leading a church spiritually as pastor.

Anyone can do this, no matter the size of your church. So just do it.

You – and your pastor – will be glad you did.

3 Ways Every Worship Leader Can Help the Pastor Win – By Mike Harland

Mike Harland is the Director of LifeWay Worship. When he’s not directing 30+ employees, you’ll find him leading worship at various churches around the country, writing/arranging worship songs and/or, writing his next book. In his spare time, he loves playing basketball and spending time with his family. Mike can be found on Twitter @MikeHarlandLW and on facebook.com/Mike.Harland.37.

The above article, “3 Ways Every Worship Leader Can Help the Pastor Win” was written by Mike Harland. The article was excerpted from https://worshiplife.com/2018/09/10/3-ways-every-worship-leader-can-help-the-pastor-win-by-mike-harland/.

The material is copyrighted and should not be reprinted under any other name or author. However, this material may be freely used for personal study or research purposes.

This article may not be written by an Apostolic author, but it contains many excellent principles and concepts that can be adapted to most churches. As the old saying goes, “Eat the meat. Throw away the bones.”

Posted in AIS File Library, JD - Job Descriptions, MU - Music Ministry, MUGE - Music Ministry, MUMA - Music Management0 Comments

7 Ways to Help a Musically Challenged, Older Believer Worship

7 Ways to Help a Musically Challenged, Older Believer Worship
Chuck Lawless

I’m that person. I love to sing God’s praises, but I know nothing about music. I’m also old enough that I’m offered the senior discount at restaurants (even though I actually don’t qualify yet . . .). Here’s how you might help people like me worship better:

At least when you first introduce a song, sing it through a few times. With hymnals long laid aside, I often don’t know the melody of a song. By time I catch it, I’ll have lost an opportunity to worship. Let me hear the song a couple of times first, though, and I’ll soon be ready to sing.
Don’t assume I know the lyrics. The fact that it’s a song you and all your friends know well doesn’t mean the rest of us know it. Somehow – on the screen, in the bulletin, via a hymnal, etc. – make sure I have the words.

Help me to hear the words over the music. I openly admit my age here, but I really don’t think my age is the issue. If the music is so loud that I can’t hear the leader, the worship team, or myself sing, what’s the point of the words?

Sing a hymn once in awhile. I don’t want to sing hymns all the time, and I never want to sing hymns poorly. Occasionally, though, a well-done hymn takes me back to the early days of my faith walk – and helps me renew my commitment to God.

Tell me when praise choruses come directly from the Bible. I hope I recognize when that’s the case, but maybe not always. Here’s the point: when you show me that I’m actually singing the words of the Bible, I listen and sing better. (And, as a side note, people will think twice before complaining about music selections that come directly from God’s Word . . . ).

Help me to see the lyrics of any song, including individual and choir specials. Any song is a message, and I will hear the message better if I can see the words that others are singing. Plus, seeing the words will help me to hear them when a choir’s enunciation is not as clear as it should be. I miss the message if I don’t understand the words.

Smile, and genuinely worship as you lead us. I don’t want you to be a show, but nor am I inclined to follow you if you seem to be the lead corpse among the dead. I want to worship God, so let me see your joy in Him.

All right, older and musically challenged believers, here’s your opportunity. What would you add to this list?

The above article, “7 Ways to Help a Musically Challenged, Older Believer Worship” was written by Chuck Lawless. The article was excerpted from chucklawless.com. November 16, 2016.

The material is copyrighted and should not be reprinted under any other name or author. However, this material may be freely used for personal study or research purposes.

This article may not be written by an Apostolic author, but it contains many excellent principles and concepts that can be adapted to most churches. As the old saying goes, “Eat the meat. Throw away the bones.”

Posted in AIS File Library, JD - Job Descriptions, MU - Music Ministry, MUGE - Music Ministry, MUMA - Music Management0 Comments

Hire the Right Worship Pastor

Hire the Right Worship Pastor
Church Fuel

INTRODUCTION

If you’ve downloaded this resource, it’s probably because you’re looking for a new Worship Pastor.

That can be a daunting task.

Because other than the Senior Pastor, it’s the most visible role in the church.

Too many churches end up with someone who isn’t quite the right fit. Maybe the skills are there, but the chemistry just isn’t right. Getting this wrong can actually divide a church.

No process can guarantee the right result. After all, we’re talking about imperfect people and imperfect organizations.

Our goal in this book is to lay out a process that will give you the best chance of finding just the right person. We want to provide clarity at key points in the process. We want to help you have conversations in advance that increase the likelihood of ending up with just the right fit.

We’re going to talk through these four big ideas:

WHEN IS IT TIME TO HIRE A WORSHIP PASTOR?
1. HIRE TO YOUR BIGGEST OPPORTUNITY, NOT YOUR BIGGEST PAIN
2. WHAT IS THE ACTUAL ROLE AND WHERE DOES IT FIT ON THE TEAM?
3. WHO IS THE RIGHT PERSON AND WHERE DO WE FIND THEM?
4. HOW DO WE INTEGRATE THEM INTO OUR TEAM AND CULTURE?

Sit back, pour a cup of coffee, and let’s walk through this thing together.

IS IT REALLY TIME TO HIRE SOMEONE?

If you’re leading a growing church, at some point, you’ll need to hire someone.

Maybe you need to hire several people. Should you hire a creative arts pastor or is it time to get a full-time student pastor? Should you split the children’s ministry role and hire someone new or does your church need a small groups director?

If you’re wrestling through the question of who to hire next, here’s some practical advice.

1. HIRE TO YOUR BIGGEST OPPORTUNITY, NOT YOUR BIGGEST PAIN
In every organization,we had pains,things we wanted to eliminate, and opportunities we wanted to pursue. If you don’t have the resources to do both, I recommend siding with growth.

Sure, it would be nice to have some administrative help, but you might be able to eliminate the pain by outsourcing. Of course, you need someone to take some things off your plate, but it’s likely more tasks would take their place.

That’s why (in most cases) you should look to hire for growth opportunities, not management.

In Bill Hybels’ book Leadership Axioms, he talks about something he calls plus side and minus side hires. In a church, plus side hires will be directly responsible for people coming to church. Plus side hires should result in growth. For example, a children’s pastor should help attract families with children to church.

Minus side hires aren’t bad hires, but they don’t have a direct line to growth. They may facilitate it, but they don’t produce it. Bookkeepers are minus side people.

What is bringing new people to your church? What ministry has the greatest likelihood of directly inviting people to church? Put your staff resources there.

If someone on your team comes to you and says, “We need to hire someone;’ don’t dismiss them. Instead, ask them to write a detailed proposal. Have them write down what they would do, how much they would make, and why it’s important to the growth and health of the ministry. If you can’t clarify all the details, you’re not ready to start looking.
Before you add anyone to the team, you need a strong one-page ministry plan. You need to have a clear purpose, mission, and vision. You should have a simple and articulated strategy. You should know where you are going.

We have a one-page template (and some coaching on exactly how to do it), inside the Church Fuel membership program. You can access the training and download the templates instantly as soon as you join.

If you don’t have a strategic plan, adding people to the mix will create more confusion. You will hire people in response to a short-term need and then wonder what to do with them when that need is gone. You’ll hire too many generalists who are good people and who can help you, but fail to give them measurable outcomes that truly matter to the entire organization.

Your purpose, mission, strategy, and goals should inform who you should hire next.

There will always be more to do than staff to do it. That’s why investing in volunteers and leaders is a wise thing to do. Before you hire someone, make sure you have maxed out your volunteer leadership development plan.

There are people in your church who are not serving because they haven’t personally been asked. There are people serving in ineffective ministries that should be recruited to serve in more impactful and more important ministries. Others are serving in the wrong ministry.
And there are people in your church who would get involved if you had a solid process for recruiting, training, and pastoring volunteers.

People in your church have incredible capacity, often more than we give them credit for. They could take on more volunteer roles. They are waiting for the opportunity to lead.

Nine times out of ten, a high-capacity volunteer will bring more value to the table than a part-time staff member.

9 TIMES OUT OF 10, A HIGH-CAPACITY VOLUNTEER WILL BRING MORE VALUE TO THE TABLE THAN A PART-TIME STAFF MEMBER

Lifepoint Church in Fredericksburg, Virginia is a growing church that spends less than 35% of their budget on staff. They hire people to lead ministry, not do ministry. They can do this because they have an intentional strategy to develop volunteers.

While their staff to attendance ratio is low, their adults to volunteer ratio is high. In other words, they choose to under-staff so they can over-volunteer.

There are times when you really do need to expand your staff. With church growth comes more responsibilities and more need for both volunteers and staff.

But make sure you’re not hiring people to do what volunteers should be doing in your church. Before you hire people, make sure you’ve done your best to develop volunteers and volunteer leaders.

Besides, the person you’re about to hire can’t do it all.

Before you bring someone new to the team, you need to make sure your entire organization is set up and prepared for the new person. There will be meetings, new communication loops, and additional confusion when you bring in someone new.

Before you hire someone, make sure the position is crystal clear. You need a job profile, describing the kind of person you’re looking for. This takes a lot of work. You also need a clear job description, with measurable outcomes built right in. We’re going to show you how to write this.

And before you hire someone, make sure the position is fully funded, not just for a few months with the hope they will “pay for themselves” Even a plus side hire will take the time to get up to speed and start paying for themselves.

Too many churches scrape some money together to hire a part-time person (or a really underpaid and overworked full-time person). So many times, that person isn’t set up for success. The church would have been better off waiting and funding the position at a higher level.

Once you’ve decided it’s time to hire someone, let’s go ahead and take a look at what kind of hire you need to make.

WHAT IS THE ROLE AND WHERE DOES IT FIT?
The journey to finding the best worship pastor for your church starts with clarifying exactly what you’re looking for.

Are you looking for someone to lead worship on Sunday, build a team, or oversee technology? Are you looking for someone with musical ability or leadership skills? Do you need someone to lead the church or are you looking for someone to lead a service?

Your worship pastor can take on many roles. Technology master. Listening ear. Expert problem-solver. So you need to ask . . . what will your worship pastor do? Just as every church is different, so are the needs and culture of every church, thus, so every worship pastor is different.

Many churches, from church plants that don’t have a full-time staff position, to multi-site churches who prefer this model, choose to bring in people on a Sunday morning.
A worship leader contractor may be perfect for churches who:
Can’t afford a part-time or full-time employee
Want a professional fill-in for their worship pastor
Are just starting out

The independent contractor may fill in for the regular worship leader from time to time or they may play regularly and receive a weekly stipend.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A CONTRACTOR:
* They are paid a fixed fee per service rendered, for example, for leading worship in one church service.
*They have flexibility as to when and where they can work.
*They have the flexibility to decline an engagement and/or has the freedom to find a substitute.
*They have the freedom to seek out opportunities to do similar work for other churches.
* They manage their own training and development.
* They usually operate with a written service agreement or simple contract.
A contractor is not technically an employee, so they determine their own practice schedules and have the ability to decline work opportunities. In the truest sense, they are self-employed and agree to perform a task for your church.

When it comes to hiring a contractor to lead worship, you have a lot of freedom. If your church would like to, you’re free to dictate what music will be played, practice and service times, or supply the music and instruments. You don’t need a formal employment agreement, though it’s probably smart to have a simple contractor agreement.

Independent contractors are not considered employees of the church so you don’t issue a W2 like you do other full-time employees. You issue them a 1099 instead.

#2. PART TIME STAFF MEMBER

Many churches may hire a part time worship leader or worship pastor. Here’s what that might look like:

They are paid an hourly or salary fee.
They work less than 30 hours a week.
They are more involved in the culture and community of the church.
They have more of a set work and practice schedule.
They work solely for one church.
They report to someone else on the staff, usually the Pastor.

The part-time worship pastor is much more permanent than the contractor. They’re an integral member of a church team. They should know and be invested in the lives of people there and come up with new ideas to help your church grow and improve.

A part-time worship pastor may be great for churches that:

Can’t afford a full-time employee.

Have someone in mind they’d like to become a full-time employee.

The part time position is often the most confusing It’s not as simple and structured as the contractor but it’s not a full-time position either. It’s easy for people to feel caught in the middle.

In many cases, there are unrealistic job descriptions and an overall lack of clarity.

Clarity is important for every person and position, but if you opt for a part-time worship leader, make sure you put even more emphasis on getting on the same page by being clear with what is expected of your worship leader or pastor, answering any questions they may have, and giving them the freedom to take ownership of their role (without micro-managing).

A FULL-TIME WORSHIP LEADER.
The full-time worship leader works at least 40 hours a week at your church. They live, eat, and breathe all things that have to do with worship, production, and everything in between. They disciple others, are usually versed in how to deal with technical issues and/or setup, are constantly on the go, and attend weekly meetings with the rest of your staff.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A FULL-TIME EMPLOYEE:
They are paid an hourly or salary fee.
They work 40+ hours a week.
They are heavily involved in the culture and community of the church.
They have a set work/practice schedule (whether through a superior or making their own).
They work solely for one church.
* They report to someone, usually the Senior Pastor.
A full-time worship pastor is a great option for:
Churches that can afford it and are ready to improve that area of ministry.
Churches that have multiple services or worship environments.
Churches looking to build a culture of worship.

The full-time worship leader may have some responsibilities related to the worship service but not necessarily music. For example, they may oversee technology or facilities of the Sunday morning environment.

The full-time worship leader often ends up pastoring both those on and off the worship “team!’ They may plan services, but they are typically responsible for more.

Some churches separate the job of leading worship and the job of planning the services by hiring a full-time creative arts pastor.

A creative arts pastor might oversee production, worship, and other creative elements of a Sunday morning service, without having to be the one that weekly leads people to worship every Sunday.

The creative arts pastor oversees, delegates, plans, and get things done.They may manage a worship leader or a team of musicians, but they are first and foremost a leader.
Like a full-time worship leader, here are the characteristics of a full-time Creative Arts pastor:

CHARACTERISTICS OF A FULL-TIME CREATIVE ARTS PASTOR:
They are paid an hourly or salary fee.
They work 40+ hours a week.

They are heavily involved in the culture and community of the church.
They have a set work/practice schedule (whether through a superior or making their own).
They work solely for one church.

* They usually have people who report to them.
A full-time creative arts pastor is a great option for:
Large churches who want to separate the task of leading worship and leading people.
Churches with more than 1,000 regular attenders.

Churches where it’s too much for one person to lead worship and lead the ministry.

When deciding which hire is right for you, note that these are all great options.There is no one “right” option. Another important thing to note when deciding which hire is right for you is the difference between a worship leader and a worship pastor.

In his article, David Santistevan discusses the difference between a worship leader and a worship pastor.

The gist?

A worship leader leads a service. A worship pastor leads people.

We’re not saying you can’t use the title ‘worship leader’. But when you are searching for a candidate, look for someone with a pastor’s heart. Someone who isn’t a diva. Someone who cares and prays for the people in your church, and who truly lives worship past Sunday services.

A WORSHIP LEADER LEADS A SERVICE. A WORSHIP PASTOR LEADS PEOPLE

If you’re a pastor and you’re still not sure what sort of worship pastor you’re looking for, or should hire, right now . . . that’s okay. Assess the needs of your church and figure out when and who you should hire.

Job descriptions can be helpful. They’re a list of all the tasks this person will do.

And the final bullet point on the list usually says “other duties” which is a comical way to say, “We’re not really sure about what you’re going to end up doing so we want to cover our bases!’
But when you set out to find the right worship pastor, you need something a little different. You need a job profile.

A job description describes the role and tasks associated with it. It’s usually a list of tasks that need to be done.

Here are some worship leader specific descriptions from the Effective Church Group, Cedar Creek Church, and Next Level Church.

A job profile describes the kind of person that will be successful in a position. It certainly describes the role and tasks associated with it, but it also includes necessary skills, desired outcomes, and measurable results.

A job profile is more about who than what. It describes the kind of person that will be successful. It gets at the values of the church and talks about the outcome of the role.

You can use a template, but we recommend you wrestle through these questions. Failure to get a good profile means too many people look right for the job, rather than actually being the right fit for the job.

When you’re creating a job profile, there are some key things you’ll want to include in there, as follows:

ABOUT US Describe who your church is and what you’re about. Lots of people will agree with your mission, but not everyone may agree with your vision (or how to get there).

SUMMARY OF THE POSITION Give a summary about the position itself.

GOALS AND EXPECTATIONS. Communicate your expectations for this position in advance, before you start talking to anyone. Are there broader expectations here? Should all staff be tithing? Create clarity here and leave as little room as possible for there to be any confusion.

This tends to be more common in secular jobs. The bottom line is that there are performance expectations for this role. Do you want your worship leader to increase band or production members by 20% in their first 12 months? Make sure you clarify what those indicators are.

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES This is the job description part. A list of what your worship pastor will be doing throughout the week.

SKILL AND REQUIREMENTS. Does your worship leader need to play with a click track? What kind of experience should they have? Do they need to know how to manage teams/use planning center? Or is there a learning curve and room for them to learn on the go?

SALARY RANGE It is crucial to be clear about the salary range, especially in the beginning stages. You don’t want to waste you and your candidate’s time. This can be an uncomfortable conversation for both parties, but it’s helpful for the church to remember that a candidate’s family is their first ministry and responsibility. The last thing you want to do is go through a dozen steps with a candidate only to find out that your salary offering does not meet their needs or expectations. This also leads to a setback in your progress of finding someone who can fill that need.

These goals, expectations, and indicators are what set aside a job profile from a job description. This way, you’re creating clarity for what you expect of your worship pastor, who you are as a church, and you leave little room for confusion.

Including this information can help you improve and expedite your candidate selection process. This way, you can worry more about if your church and your candidate are a good fit, rather than information being lost in miscommunication.

Where do they fit on the team?

Never hire someone without an organizational, or org, chart. You need it, but they do too.
An org chart can help you decide what kind of role you need filled and can give you and your hire a better consider who your church is, what you do, who does what, and what exactly their expectations are (alongside your job profile).

A new employee needs to understand how they fit into the leadership structure of the church. A lack of clarity will create muddy waters and a lack of effectiveness. Remember, every time you bring a new person on to your team, you create confusion. Your org chart changes with each new person.

Before you ask around or post on websites, finalize your org chart. It could look something like the chart on the next page.

The worship pastor often falls somewhere under the accountability of the senior or associate pastor, but the beauty of creating your own org chart is that you get to organize it however you’d like.

How much .should we pay our worship pastor?

Let’s talk about money.

How much should you pay your new worship pastor?

When you set out to look for someone, it’s important to be as clear as you can be about the salary.

Of course, it varies depending on what you are looking for and what kind of hire you decide to make. Your budget, your community, and so much more go into this.

Let’s look at the different hires again and some things to consider with each one.

This is often a 1099 employee. This is the most flexible salary range, typically being paid a stipend. They could be putting in anywhere from 3-12 hours of planning, rehearsal, and leading your congregation to worship on a Sunday morning.

Depending on how many hours this person is putting in, you’re looking at somewhere from $100 -$300 per week. Mike Kim suggests $300 per week for a worship leader that is putting in about 10-12 hours a week.

THE PART-TIME WORSHIP DIRECTOR. Depending on the laws of your state, this could be either a 1099 employee or an hourly, or salaried, position. Again, really the hours put in are key here. The part-time worship leader could be working anywhere from 10-30 hours a week. This means you could be looking at paying them anywhere from $300 – $600 per week. Mike Kim suggests $500 per week for a worship director that is putting in 20+ hours a week.

THE FULL-TIME WORSHIP PASTOR. This is a salaried, W-2 position, with benefits comparable to other full time staff roles in your church. These people often end up working more than 40 hours a week. Experience and church size are two large factors that influence the full time worship pastor’s salary. A full time worship pastor’s salary can range anywhere from $23,236 to $67,318 (with the average being $41,759).

Here are some examples of real church’s worship pastor salaries. Again, we see the range from $34,000 to $56,000 annually. Less experienced, or newer, worship leaders tend to make around $30k to $40k annually, while salary increases with experience.

THE CREATIVE ARTS PASTOR This is a salaried, W-2 position, with benefits comparable to other full time staff roles in your church. Salary is similar, if not higher to a full time worship pastor because of the nature of the position. A typical creative arts pastor usually has a salary of $55,000+ annually.

This article from ChurchLeaders.com is a great way to figure out what a good annual salary for your worship pastor could be.

Consider the average income of your area. Look at factors like age, marital status, experience, and education. Look at monthly expenses and figure out, realistically, what it costs to live comfortably in your city.

The salary you set is individualized to your city and your church, and your worship pastor will appreciate the intentionality and clarity.

WHO IS THE RIGHTPERSON AND WHERE DO WE FIND THEM?

Now that you’ve created a job profile, org chart, and figured out which type of hire will be the best fit for your church, it’s time to think about the person.

FINDING CANDIDATE:
There are about three ways you can usually find a good fit for your worship leader:
Your network (i.e. LinkedIn)

Your connections have connections. The best candidates probably already have a job.They aren’t looking so you have to recruit them.

THE INTERVIEW PROCESS
Most churches figure this out every time with every new candidate, but that’s a bad idea. The best time to create your interview process is before you’re talking to any specific candidate.
We think candidates for every position in your church should go through the same process, complete each interview, and answer the same questions. You don’t, and shouldn’t, need to come up with new questions or a new process for each new candidate or job. This way, the process itself and your decision-making will get better each time you go through it.
We suggest five specific interviews. That seems like a lot, but most people hire too fast and fire too slow.

Not only do you want to avoid hiring someone too quickly, but a five-step interview process gives you the opportunity to have different people from different areas of the church evaluate and assess your new candidate.

WE SUGGEST FIVE SPECIFIC INTERVIEWS … MOST PEOPLE HIRE TOO FAST AND FIRE TOO SLOW

Before you spend time talking to candidates, we recommend you first use a form to get basic information from them and see if you’d like to continue. You don’t want to talk to everyone interested in the job, so use some questions to pre-screen candidates. Here are a few questions we recommend:

What compelled you to apply for the position?

What sticks out to you about our church and this opportunity?

What are you currently learning?

What are you good at?

Where do you currently work and what do you do?

What do you love about your job? What do you not love about it?

What are you looking for in your next job?

The pre-screening questions are intentionally simple, but you can certainly ask deeper questions as well. You could ask questions like:

Tell me about the last conflict you had. What was the outcome and where does that relationship stand today?
Has there ever been a time where you had a really difficult volunteer or someone under you that wasn’t submitting to your leadership? How did you handle that situation?
Do you have a volunteer or team member that you’re really proud of when it comes to their growth? What happened and how did you disciple them?
Have you ever had to let a team member go? What did that process look like?

These questions will provide you the opportunity to get to know more than just professional information about your potential hire, but to see what kind of person they are, what their personality is like, and you’ll get to know them on a deeper level. You’ll find that people’s answers can be revealing into both what type of person they are and what they would be like in their role.

Once you find someone you want to move forward with, continue to the first interview.

The purpose of this interview is to determine if you want to seriously consider the person for this role.

Your main goal during this interview: ELIMINATE PEOPLE AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE
Ask the same questions to each candidate. Stay on track and push for specific examples. It’s okay to do this over a call, but aim to do this interview in person. Here are some questions you’ll want to ask during this interview:

What are your ministry goals?

What are you really good at professionally? (Look for 8-12 positive traits at a time where they were decisive.)

What are you not good at or not interested in doing professionally?
Who were your last five bosses and how would they each rate your performance on a 1-10 scale?

Really delve into these questions. If someone says, “I just want to help people:’ to answer the career goals question, continue to push. That’s not a good enough answer. If they give shallow or expected answers, keep digging. You’re looking for specifics.

Once you feel that you are seriously considering your candidate as a future hire, you’re ready to move on to the second interview.

INTERVIEW #2: PATTERNS
People are not their past, but past behavior is most often the best predictor of future performance. If you want to know how someone may perform in a role (i.e. as a worship pastor), look at how they’ve performed in their last role.
Your main goal during this interview:

TO MAKE PREDICTIONS ABOUT HOW YOUR CANDIDATE IS LIKELY TO PERFORM IN THE FUTURE

For each of your candidate’s prior jobs, ask these questions:
What were you hired to do?

What accomplishments are you most proud of? Exceptional people tend to talk about outcomes connected to expectations. Mediocre people talk about events, people, or job aspects not related to results.

What were some low points during that job?

Who were the people you worked with? Further questions here may be: What was it like to work with your boss? What will they say is your biggest strength or weakness? How would you rate the team you inherited? What changes did you make? Did you hire or fire anyone? How would you rate the team when you left?

Why did you leave that job?

Make sure to go through this series of questions for every chapter or story of their life. Walk through career history chronologically. This could take up to 2 to 3 hours.

INTERVIEW #3: RESULTS

This interview is focused on the desired outcome of the position.

Your main goal during this interview:

TALK ABOUT EXPECTATIONS OF THE JOB AND DRILL DOWN ON HOW THE CANDIDATE HAS PERFORMED IN RELATED AREAS IN THE PAST

You’re not just trying to determine what you think your potential hire will do, but what they have done in similar environments with similar objectives. Here’s a short guide of how you’ll want this interview to go.

Let your candidate know “the purpose of this interview is to talk about” (a specific outcome or competency). For your worship pastor position, it might be “building a team of volunteer musicians:’

What are your biggest accomplishments in this area during your career?
What are your insights into your biggest mistakes and lessons learned in this area?

You’ll really want to reiterate those expectations here of what you expect from your worship pastor and gauge the strengths and weaknesses of your potential hire.

INTERVIEW #4: REFERENCES
Once you have a strong candidate in mind, it’s time to talk to their previous boss and/or co-workers.

Your main goal during this interview: INTERVIEW YOUR CANDIDATE’S REFERENCES
Do not skip this step.

You’re not looking for references to give generic feedback or have someone simply check a box. We include this as one of the interviews, because we think you should actually interview the person giving the reference.

Here are specific questions you may want to ask during this interview:

In what context did you work with this person?

What were the candidate’s biggest strengths?

What were the candidate’s biggest areas for improvement back then?

How would you rate his or her overall performance in that job on a 1-10 scale? What about his/her performance causes you to give them that rating?

The candidate mentioned that he/she struggled with . Can you tell me more about that?

This interview is important because anyone can talk themselves up. You want an un-biased outlook on how your potential hire has done in former roles. You don’t have to imagine what they would be like – you can talk to people who actually worked with them. This is another great opportunity to gauge exactly what your potential worship pastor is like and how they would perform.

YOU DON’T HAVE TO IMAGINE WHAT THEY WOULD BE LIKE-YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE WHO ACTUALLY WORKED WITH THEM HIRE THE RIGHT WORSHIP PASTOR

INTERVIEW #5: RELATIONSHIPS

This will be your most relaxed “interview’!

Other team members and spouses should be involved in this step and it should happen in a casual setting.

Remember that every person you hire adds to your team culture. Your culture will heavily influence them, but this certainly goes both ways. There are few ways that will disrupt a healthy leadership culture like having the wrong person at the table.

You don’t have to be best friends with everyone that works at your church, but it shouldn’t be awkward to hang out with them. Take them to dinner, or dessert. Go to a baseball game. Hang out at a cookout. Find something you have in common and do it outside of the office together and/or get other people involved.

Another great tool you can use here is the “spouse test.”

This is a great way to go about really getting to know your candidate. To go through with this, you’ll want to request the presence of your potential hire’s spouse during an interview. This could be in person or via video chat. Do this in the early stages of the interview process and pay attention to how the candidate’s spouse is reacting to your candidate’s answers.

His/her body language will clue you in to the candidate’s response. Is she smiling and nodding her head as she listens to her husband speak? Or does he have a blank stare on his face like the candidate is giving you an answer they think you want to hear? This test can go a long way.
While these interviews and questions should stay the same every time you go through this process, you can involve different people in different phases. If you’re bringing a candidate in from out of town, you should feel free to do interview 2 and 3 on the same day. Just try to involve people and change up the environment.

HOW DO WE INTEGRATE THIS NEW PERSON INTO OUR TEAM?

This is the fun part.

You’ve done all the hard work of creating a job profile, clarifying the roles and responsibilities and making sure your new worship pastor is a great fit for the team.

Now it’s time to make the official offer, get them set up for success, and truly integrate your new leader into the culture of your church.

JOB OFFER LETTER

A job offer letter is a great way to clarify everything that’s been discussed up to this point. It’s not an employment contract like the NFL (and there probably aren’t million dollar signing bonuses), but this one-page letter is a simple way to get things started.

A simple letter will do the trick. We’ve provided one example above.You’ll find more examples from workable and the balance.

One thing to do here is to reach out to any other people you’ve talked to and let them know that you’ve made a decision. Don’t send a generic form letter; reach out to anyone who didn’t get the job in person.

ONBOARDING

G.I. Joe used to say that knowing is half the battle.

When it comes to bringing on a new employee, hiring is just half the battle. Their first 90 days on the job are critical to everyone’s success and happiness. That’s why having an onboarding process is so important.

You might have guessed by now that you want to create an onboarding process to use every time you bring someone on to the team.
Here’s a simple checklist that you can use:

YOU DO:
Review and sign employee handbook (here is one of the best employee handbooks we’ve ever seen).
Review and sign confidentiality agreement.
Complete financial paperwork (including direct deposit, benefits, and pastoral housing allowance form).
Attend the new member’s class.
* Fill out 30 and 90 day feedback forms.

WE DO:
Create email address
Create Fellowship One login
Set up voicemail extension
Provide access to Dropbox and Google Docs
Set up direct deposit
W4 and 19
Set 90 day review meeting
Update the website with picture, bio, and contact information
* Email introductions to key community leaders

This is also the time to reiterate expectations to your new hire, not to micro-manage your new worship pastor, but so they are not thrown into the deep end. Make sure to create clarity so your worship pastor knows what they’re supposed to be doing.

TRAINING

Pastors are busy.

One minute you’re writing a sermon, the next minute you’re meeting with someone in need, and the next you’re leading a meeting.

With all the urgent things on your plate, it’s no wonder there’s a struggle to find the time to do some of the important things.

Like developing your staff.

Most pastors know leadership development is important, but few of us actually find the time to actually do it.

Most pastors realize more leaders need to step up and lead at a higher level.

Once you’ve hired and integrated your new worship pastor, the job continues. In a way, this part of the process is never complete and it applies to everyone on your team, not just your newest staff member.

The healthiest church cultures value continued growth and training. Since people drift to complexity, it’s up to the leader to continually cast clarity. Since all of us fall back into comfortable patterns, we need opportunities to grow and be challenged in our thinking.
What can training look like in your church?

If you have regularly scheduled meetings in your church, perhaps a weekly or monthly staff meeting, you already have built in time for training.

You don’t have to devote your entire staff meeting to leadership development, but a wise pastor gives at least some time to this effort. Before you begin discussing the details of ministry, take some time to get better as pastors and leaders. The more time you find to do this, the more you’ll equip people to solve problems outside of meetings.

Team Training videos are one of the benefits of Church Fuel. Twice a month, we send a resources you can watch at the beginning of your regularly scheduled team meetings.
It’s a series of 10-12 minute videos from our world-class coaches featuring some of the best skill-based leadership coaching. Every session comes with a one-page summary of the video as well as thoughtful discussion questions and points to help you and your staff become better leaders.

We did the prep work, all you need to do is gather your team and press play. Watch the video, use the discussion guide and then dive into the regular details of your meeting. You can do this once or twice a month during your meetings.

“You cannot develop staff from behind a closed office door,” writes Paul Chappel. The best leadership development happens one-on-one, through real life situations or intentional conversations.

Think about all the things you do as a pastor or leader. Many of those tasks can become leadership development opportunities if you simply bring someone with you.

Michael Bungay Stanier says coaching should be a daily, informal act, not an occasional event. That’s why ordinary conversations are one of the best places to do coaching and development.

In The Coaching Habit, Stanier suggests seven questions: ORDINARY CONVERSATIONS
ARE ONE OF THE BEST PLACES TO DO COACHING AND DEVELOPMENT

1. The Kickstart Question: What’s on your mind?
1. The AWE Question: And what else?
1. The Focus Question: What’s the real problem here for you?
1. The Foundation Question: What do you want?
1. The Lazy Question: How can I help?
1. The Strategic Question: If you’re saying “yes” to this, what are you saying “no” to?
1. The Learning Question: What was most useful for you?

These questions aren’t meant for a leadership retreat or a formal training environment, they are quick, casual conversations that can happen anytime.

3. Learning Opportunities

There are no shortages of leadership opportunities available to you. In fact, the sheer number of opportunities might be one of the very reasons you don’t make time for this important area.

But let me highlight three of my favorite opportunities for you to help your worship leader learn.

Books

Think about this for a moment. For about $15, which includes priority shipping, you can buy someone’s life work. They take years of experiences, organize, write, edit, re-write, typeset and brand everything into a small volume you can get at any bookstore. When you think about all that goes into creating a great book, the value is incredible.

Not every leader on your team will enjoy reading, so consider summaries, videos, and audiobooks. There’s no good reason NOT to do this.

Conferences

There are several incredible leadership conferences available to you. They are more expensive, and you’ll have to schedule and travel, but with some planning, they can be a big opportunity for you and your team.

My suggestion is to pick one event, make the commitment, put it on the calendar, and participate whole-heartedly. It will never be convenient for so many people to be gone. It will never be inexpensive. But it’s almost always worth it.

I know a church where a business owner in the church personally pays for the staff to attend a leadership conference together. This leader knows the value and wants the staff of his church to experience the benefit.

Courses

There are many online or digital courses you can go through as a team.

The Systems Course will help you and your team create healthy systems across all ministries in your church. There are videos you can watch together and worksheets and exercises to create great conversations.

Breaking 200 is a 7-module online course designed to help you break the 200 attendance barrier. You don’t need a big team to go through this course, but we’ve seen churches that involve a few people in the learning opportunities see better results.
There are courses on theology, marketing, communication, stewardship and dozens of other topics. If there’s a topic that needs attention, I bet you could find a quality online course to help you.

4. Theological Training
Being on staff at a church should actually deepen your understanding of the Bible and increase your love of the Lord. But this is one of the most often overlooked opportunities. The pastor and staff are busy teaching others how to follow Jesus, but who is helping the helpers?

That’s why spiritual development has to be a part of leadership development.
Glen Kreun, one of the pastors at Saddleback Church, writes:

“The church is a theological institution, so I believe that staff development includes an understanding of biblical theology. Most churches probably wouldn’t hire a pastor who does not have seminary or Bible school training, but what about other staff? Every staff member is part of your ministry leadership team. Yes, that means custodial staff, receptionists, administrative support, as well as your licensed and ordained pastors. The more theology your staff understands, the better equipped they are to represent Christ and your church in the community!”
As you develop a training system, don’t forget that the church is first and foremost a spiritual endeavor. Make time for prayer, fellowship, and Bible study.

PUT I. TOGETHER FOR ALA YOUR PEOPLE

One of the best practices of leadership development is helping everyone create their own personal leadership development plan.

Because there are so many things to work on and opportunities to learn, a one-page plan provides the much-needed clarity. This is a tangible way you move from the desire to get better as leader to a plan to get better as a leader.

This isn’t complicated, and we provide a template and a coaching video for Church Fuel members.

Start by writing down your leadership development goal. This is the area of leadership you want to improve in the next season. Then write down what you’re going to actually do to accomplish your goal.

What specific books are you going to read? Choose books that will help you accomplish your goal, not books that are on someone else’s recommended reading list. Go ahead and order them and sit them on your desk.

What conference are you going to attend? The most popular one may be a good choice, but maybe there’s something more specific that will help you in your area of need. Research options, make a choice, and then book your ticket.

What coaching group can you join or what informal group can you put together? The key is being intentional and putting yourself in the right learning environment.

Your one page leadership development plan might include podcasts, conference calls, relationships, mentors, mastermind groups or even solitary thinking time. It’s personalized for each person.

Move through all your options and get things off the list, leaving behind real and tangible things that will make you better as a leader. You’re left with one page of helpful action steps, not a long list of random opportunities.

Imagine if each person, including your new worship pastor, had a one page plan like this. Imagine the chemistry that would develop if you each pulled out your plan and discussed it openly and honestly.

Everyone on staff at a church should have a one-page plan like this.

Remember, decide if you need to hire someone (or if you could develop your volunteer leaders), decide which hire you need, and start forming a plan and process to hire staff. We’re always here at Church Fuel to help you with any of this training and onboarding steps. You can reach out to us at hello@churchfuel.com and if we can’t serve you, we will connect you with someone who can.

We hope you found this hiring resource to be helpful and that you begin to make excellent hires that are a great fit for your team.

The above article, “Hire the Right Worship Pastor” was written by Church Fuel. The article was excerpted from a book called, Hire the Right Worship Pastor.
The material is copyrighted and should not be reprinted under any other name or author. However, this material may be freely used for personal study or research purposes.
This article may not be written by an Apostolic author, but it contains many excellent principles and concepts that can be adapted to most churches. As the old saying goes, ‘Eat the meat. Throw away the bones.”

Posted in AIS File Library, JD - Job Descriptions, MU - Music Ministry, MUGE - Music Ministry, MUMA - Music Management0 Comments

Lighting for Video – Not as Simple Anymore

Lighting for Video – Not as Simple Anymore
Jim Kumorek

The lowdown on sanctuary lighting and why shooting video in your sanctuary requires more than a camera

MOST CHURCHES, ESPECIALLY those with production-oriented service styles, have some sort of theatrical lighting system installed to achieve good illumination on their stage or platform so that those attending can clearly see what’s happening during the service. When these churches decided to start capturing or broadcasting their services (and in broadcasting I include live streaming or on-demand streaming via the Internet), they find the look of their video doesn’t compare to what is seen when attending in person.

In some cases, it can look pretty bad.

This can be very confusing for those new to video, and some may assume that their video equipment is inadequate. While this certainly can be an issue, there’s an excellent chance that their problem, at least in part, lies with their lighting.

“Cameras see things differently than human eyes do,” explains Jim Uphoff, marketing product manager for entertainment luminaires at Electronic Theatre Controls (ETC). “Our brains intuit and interpret what our eyes see, adjusting our perception of white balance and exposure on the fly. A camera records only what it sees, and it operates within a much more basic spectrum. What you see onstage and what you see on a monitor can be very different. Indigo and really dark blue both come across as blue on camera, for example, and magenta will often appear red.”

“If you aren’t thinking specifically about video,” adds Todd Elliott, owner of Fusion Productions, founder of FILO Conferences, and former technical arts director at Willow Creek Community Church, “you’ll end up with areas that are so bright you have to close down the camera iris to account for them, which causes the darker area to become even more dark. You lose all the detail in those dark areas. Most of the time the difference between lighting for attendees and great lighting for video isn’t that noticeable to the naked eye. But the camera isn’t as smart as we are, so we have to make those adjustments to help the camera create the image we desire.”

Josh Holowicki, founder of E2i Design, points out these additional issues that can come up when not lighting specifically for video. “Bad shadows are another issue. Lighting that is too steep or not in the right position really looks poor by creating negative shadows. Shadows that are intentional are good, but unintentional shadows (which most of them are) are not a good thing.”

“No back lighting is another issue as subjects often just bleed into the background with no stage depth,” Holowicki continues. “And for a teaching stage wash, subjects moving in and out of the light as they walk across the stage is a regular occurrence with what we see. Without an even field of light, the camera is so sensitive to the light, it shows every single flaw in the lighting.”

THE BASICS

Clearly, to make your video look great, some serious attention needs to be paid to your lighting.

The first step is to make sure you have appropriate front and back lighting for your stage.

“We need to follow basic lighting principles for key lighting to ensure we give the camera something good to look at,” states Holowicki. “This, in its basic form, means we need two points of light from the front and one point of light from the back for each subject we are trying to light. If we want to create a – teaching wash – we would simply multiply this basic three-point lighting design across the entire teaching area.”

“Backlighting the people is very important,” says Elliott. “It is amazing how dark the background can be, but if you’re backlighting the people, so that we can see their outline, their image jumps off the background.”

At a more practical level, Elliott describes the exercise they went through at Willow Creek Community Church each week. “We lit the background as well as we could and set our camera irises so that we could still see it well. From there we then lit the people so that they looked great and we could still see the background. This led to coming up with a procedure we could teach our volunteers so that it was easily repeatable.”

In summary, states Uphoff, “For the best video results, a designer must adjust the lighting so that it is within the color and exposure range of the camera and trust that the live audience’s eyes will adapt. In general, the more adjustable the fixtures are, the better. If the fixture can be adjusted, you’ll be able to tune your lighting on the fly to compensate for any issues you encounter.”

LED, OR NOT LED?

There was a time when LED lighting received a very bad rap for lighting for video, and justifiably so. Especially with lower-cost fixtures, LED lighting tended to flicker when seen through a video camera, and colors often showed up radically different on camera.

“LED sources are spot on for video applications now,” states Holowicki. “The development from manufacturers with the lamp source has given us the ability to do entire spaces entirely out of LED. Some things to look at often come down to manufacturer. You first want to be sure the product is rated for use with video. This means that it is going to be managed internally at the fixture for flicker. Some manufacturers even allow you to set the flicker rate of their LED diodes in the fixture to align with your video refresh rates. I personally like having a variable white color temp correction within the fixture. This allows us to set the exact color temp for the application as well as adjust for different subjects who may be speaking on our stage.”

“Manufacturers have also started using more colors of LEDs in their fixtures, not just RGB,” adds Uphoff. “The spectrums and adjustability have gotten better, and the dimming performance-which was a problem for a long time-has gotten better. Since LED fixtures are no longer new to the market, people have had time to get better at using them, and control solutions for mixing and tuning color have also greatly improved.”

MIXED COLOR TEMPERATURE CHALLENGES

As video becomes more prevalent and less expensive, churches are increasingly using video sources such as LED video walls on their stage, which get picked up by their video cameras. Video walls tend to have a much cooler color temperature, up around the 6,000K range. If you’re using uncorrected tungsten lighting for your stage, which is around 3,200K in color temperature, the colors on the LED video walls will look completely wrong when viewed by the camera because of this color temperature mis-match.

“In recent years, we have seen a pretty dramatic shift of native color temperatures used for lighting for video,” says Uphoff. “Whereas people used to shoot in the 3,200K range, most studios have shifted to cooler color temperatures, partly because of scenarios like this. Variable-color-temperature luminaires come in handy in situations where you need to tune your lighting to match or balance other onstage elements.”

Increasing the color temperature of your stage lighting brings the lighting closer to the video wall, however, even in the mid- 4000K temperature range, there’s still a noticeable difference.

“Typically, we focus on lighting the subject and we can correct the wall as necessary,” comments Holowicki. “For the most part we can get it to align with our color temperature on the subject. But this is a solid reason to run the key lighting somewhere in the mid- 4000K color temperature range to get closer to matching the screens.”

WRAPPING IT UP

With all the new light sources a church now needs to deal with, lighting for video isn’t as simple as it used to be. “Making an event look good for both in-person and video audiences can be tricky,” says Uphoff. “At times, a designer may have to choose which audience he or she is lighting.” If you’re a multi-campus church with the majority of your attendees viewing the message via video venues, making your lighting look the best for video may need to be your priority. If you are doing mainly streaming your service online for the handful of people unable to attend in person each week, making the in-person environment may be your priority.

Holowicki sums it up well: “We’ve invested good money for the proper video gear-now we need to be sure we have the right lighting to maximize that investment.”

TERMINOLOGY

COLOR TEMPERATURE: A measurement of the color of “white” light in a particular environment. Specifically, it’s the temperature in degrees Kelvin that a theoretical black metal object would need to be heated to for it to radiate that color of white light. Daylight is 5,200K; incandescent lighting is about 3,200K. The lower the temperature, the more red-ish yellow the light is; the higher the temperature, the more blue the light is. The human brain processes different color temperatures naturally; video cameras do not and need to be told what color temperature the lighting is in a space. Paradoxically, blue is considered a cooler color, and red a warmer color. Therefore, the higher the color temperature, the cooler the light is considered.

IRIS: The part of a camera that determines how much light is let into the camera. The iris creates an adjustable sized circular hole through which light enters the camera.

KEY LIGHTING: The lighting by which a subject is primarily lit for the camera. Typically this lighting comes from in front and somewhat to the left and right of the subject via two lighting fixtures.

BACK LIGHTING: Lighting that hits the subject from above and behind, making the edges of the subject a little brighter than the key lighting.

LED LIGHTING: A light fixture whose light source is one or more Light Emitting Diodes. This is a highly efficient way of generating light. However, LEDs can not dim. In order to create an LED lighting fixture that dims, electronics in the fixture turn the LEDs on and off thousands of times per second, giving the impression that the light is at a lower intensity. This can cause a flickering effect that is particularly visible on video, however, manufacturers have mostly figured out how to avoid this.

“The camera isn’t as smart as we are, so we have to make those adjustments to help the camera create the image we desire.” -Todd Elliott of Fusion Productions

The above article, “Lighting for Video – Not as Simple Anymore” was written by Jim Kumorek. The article was excerpted from http://www.worshipfacilities.com/streaming/lighting-video-not-simple-anymore. Jun 25, 2018.

The material is copyrighted and should not be reprinted under any other name or author. However, this material may be freely used for personal study or research purposes.

This article may not be written by an Apostolic author, but it contains many excellent principles and concepts that can be adapted to most churches. As the old saying goes, “Eat the meat. Throw away the bones.”

Posted in AIS CD - Featured Stories0 Comments

Hire The Right Worship Pastor

Hire The Right Worship Pastor
ChurchFuel.com

Too many churches end up with someone who isn’t quite the right fit. Maybe the skills are there, but the chemistry just isn’t right. Getting this wrong can actually divide a church. No process can guarantee the right result. After all, we’re talking about imperfect people and imperfect organizations.

If you’re leading a growing church, at some point, you’ll need to hire someone.

If you’re wrestling through the question of who to hire next, here’s some practical advice.

In every organization, we had pains, things we wanted to eliminate, and opportunities we wanted to pursue. If you don’t have the resources to do both, I recommend siding with growth.

Sure, it would be nice to have some administrative help, but you might be able to eliminate the pain by outsourcing. Of course, you need someone to take some things off your plate, but it’s likely more tasks would take their place.

That’s why (in most cases) you should look to hire for growth opportunities, not management.

If someone on your team comes to you and says, “We need to hire someone;’ don’t dismiss them. Instead, ask them to write a detailed proposal. Have them write down what they would do, how much they would make, and why it’s important to the growth and health of the ministry. If you can’t clarify all the details, you’re not ready to start looking.

Before you add anyone to the team, you need a strong one-page ministry plan. You need to have a clear purpose, mission, and vision. You should have a simple and articulated strategy. You should know where you are going.

If you don’t have a strategic plan, adding people to the mix will create more confusion. You will hire people in response to a short-term need and then wonder what to do with them when that need is gone. You’ll hire too many generalists who are good people and who can help you, but fail to give them measurable outcomes that truly matter to the entire organization.

Your purpose, mission, strategy, and goals should inform who you should hire next.

There will always be more to do than staff to do it. That’s why investing in volunteers and leaders is a wise thing to do. Before you hire someone, make sure you have maxed out your volunteer leadership development plan.

There are people in your church who are not serving because they haven’t personally been asked. There are people serving in ineffective ministries that should be recruited to serve in more impactful and more important ministries. Others are serving in the wrong ministry.

And there are people in your church who would get involved if you had a solid process for recruiting, training, and pastoring volunteers. People in your church have incredible capacity, often more than we give them credit for. They could take on more volunteer roles. They are waiting for the opportunity to lead. Nine times out of ten, a high-capacity volunteer will bring more value to the table than a part-time staff member.

Before you bring someone new to the team, you need to make sure your entire organization is set up and prepared for the new person. There will be meetings, new communication loops, and additional confusion when you bring in someone new.

Before you hire someone, make sure the position is crystal clear. You need a job profile, describing the kind of person you’re looking for. This takes a lot of work. You also need a clear job description, with measurable outcomes built right in.

And before you hire someone, make sure the position is fully funded, not just for a few months with the hope they will “pay for themselves” Even a plus side hire will take the time to get up to speed and start paying for themselves.

Too many churches scrape some money together to hire a part-time person (or a really underpaid and overworked full-time person). So many times, that person isn’t set up for success. The church would have been better off waiting and funding the position at a higher level.

Once you’ve decided it’s time to hire someone, let’s go ahead and take a look at what kind of hire you need to make. The journey to finding the best worship pastor for your church starts with clarifying exactly what you’re looking for.

Are you looking for someone to lead worship on Sunday, build a team, or oversee technology? Are you looking for someone with musical ability or leadership skills? Do you need someone to lead the church or are you looking for someone to lead a service?

Your worship pastor can take on many roles. Technology master. Listening ear. Expert problem-solver. So you need to ask . . . what will your worship pastor do? Just as every church is different, so are the needs and culture of every church, thus, so every worship pastor is different.

A worship pastor in your church may look like one of these four things. Many churches, from church plants that don’t have a full-time staff position, to multi-site churches who prefer this model, choose to bring in people on a Sunday morning.

A part-time worship pastor may be great for churches that: Can’t afford a full-time employee. Have someone in mind they’d like to become a full-time employee. The part time position is often the most confusing It’s not as simple and structured as the contractor but it’s not a full-time position either. It’s easy for people to feel caught in the middle. In many cases, there are unrealistic job descriptions and an overall lack of clarity.

Clarity is important for every person and position, but if you opt for a part-time worship leader, make sure you put even more emphasis on getting on the same page by being clear with what is expected of your worship leader or pastor, answering any questions they may have, and giving them the freedom to take ownership of their role (without micro-managing).

The full-time worship leader may have some responsibilities related to the worship service but not necessarily music. For example, they may oversee technology or facilities of the Sunday morning environment. The full-time worship leader often ends up pastoring both those on and off the worship “team!’ They may plan services, but they are typically responsible for more.

A worship leader leads a service. A worship pastor leads people. We’re not saying you can’t use the title ‘worship leader’. But when you are searching for a candidate, look for someone with a pastor’s heart. Someone who isn’t a diva. Someone who cares and prays for the people in your church, and who truly lives worship past Sunday services.

If you’re a pastor and you’re still not sure what sort of worship pastor you’re looking for, or should hire, right now . . . that’s okay. Assess the needs of your church and figure out when and who you should hire. And the final bullet point on the list usually says “other duties” which is a comical way to say, “We’re not really sure about what you’re going to end up doing so we want to cover our bases!’

But when you set out to find the right worship pastor, you need something a little different. You need a job profile. A job description describes the role and tasks associated with it. It’s usually a list of tasks that need to be done. A job profile describes the kind of person that will be successful in a position. It certainly describes the role and tasks associated with it, but it also includes necessary skills, desired outcomes, and measurable results. A job profile is more about who than what. It describes the kind of person that will be successful. It gets at the values of the church and talks about the outcome of the role.

You can use a template, but we recommend you wrestle through these questions. Failure to get a good profile means too many people look right for the job, rather than actually being the right fit for the job. When you’re creating a job profile, there are some key things you’ll want to include in there, as follows:

Describe who your church is and what you’re about. Lots of people will agree with your mission, but not everyone may agree with your vision (or how to get there).

Give a summary about the position itself. Communicate your expectations for this position in advance, before you start talking to anyone. Are there broader expectations here? Should all staff be tithing? Create clarity here and leave as little room as possible for there to be any confusion.

This tends to be more common in secular jobs. The bottom line is that there are performance expectations for this role. Do you want your worship leader to increase band or production members by 20% in their first 12 months? Make sure you clarify what those indicators are.

This is the job description part. A list of what your worship pastor will be doing throughout the week.

Does your worship leader need to play with a click track? What kind of experience should they have? Do they need to know how to manage teams/use planning center? Or is there a learning curve and room for them to learn on the go?

It is crucial to be clear about the salary range, especially in the beginning stages. You don’t want to waste you and your candidate’s time. This can be an uncomfortable conversation for both parties, but it’s helpful for the church to remember that a candidate’s family is their first ministry and responsibility. The last thing you want to do is go through a dozen steps with a candidate only to find out that your salary offering does not meet their needs or expectations. This also leads to a setback in your progress of finding someone who can fill that need.

These goals, expectations, and indicators are what set aside a job profile from a job description. This way, you’re creating clarity for what you expect of your worship pastor, who you are as a church, and you leave little room for confusion.

Including this information can help you improve and expedite your candidate selection process. This way, you can worry more about if your church and your candidate are a good fit, rather than information being lost in miscommunication.

Where do they fit on the team? Never hire someone without an organizational, or org, chart. You need it, but they do too. An org chart can help you decide what kind of role you need filled and can give you and your hire a better consider who your church is, what you do, who does what, and what exactly their expectations are (alongside your job profile).

A new employee needs to understand how they fit into the leadership structure of the church. A lack of clarity will create muddy waters and a lack of effectiveness. Remember, every time you bring a new person on to your team, you create confusion. Your org chart changes with each new person.

Before you ask around or post on websites, finalize your org chart. It could look something like the chart on the next page. The worship pastor often falls somewhere under the accountability of the senior or associate pastor, but the beauty of creating your own org chart is that you get to organize it however you’d like.

How much should we pay our worship pastor? Let’s talk about money. How much should you pay your new worship pastor? When you set out to look for someone, it’s important to be as clear as you can be about the salary. Of course, it varies depending on what you are looking for and what kind of hire you decide to make. Your budget, your community, and so much more go into this.

Let’s look at the different hires again and some things to consider with each one.

THE PART-TIME WORSHIP DIRECTOR. Depending on the laws of your state, this could be either a 1099 employee or an hourly, or salaried, position. Again, really the hours put in are key here. The part-time worship leader could be working anywhere from 10-30 hours a week. This means you could be looking at paying them anywhere from $300 – $600 per week. Mike Kim suggests $500 per week for a worship director that is putting in 20+ hours a week.

THE FULL-TIME WORSHIP PASTOR. This is a salaried,W-2 position, with benefits comparable to other full time staff roles in your church. These people often end up working more than 40 hours a week. Experience and church size are two large factors that influence the full time worship pastor’s salary. A full time worship pastor’s salary can range anywhere from $23,236 to $67,318 (with the average being $41,759).

Here are some examples of real church’s worship pastor salaries. Again, we see the range from $34,000 to $56,000 annually. Less experienced, or newer, worship leaders tend to make around $30k to $40k annually, while salary increases with experience.

Now that you’ve created a job profile, org chart, and figured out which type of hire will be the best fit for your church, it’s time to think about the person.

FINDING CANDIDATE

There are about three ways you can usually find a good fit for your worship leader:

Your connections have connections. The best candidates probably already have a job. They aren’t looking so you have to recruit them.

Most churches figure this out every time with every new candidate, but that’s a bad idea. The best time to create your interview process is before you’re talking to any specific candidate.

We think candidates for every position in your church should go through the same process, complete each interview, and answer the same questions. You don’t, and shouldn’t, need to come up with new questions or a new process for each new candidate or job. This way, the process itself and your decision-making will get better each time you go through it.

We suggest five specific interviews. That seems like a lot, but most people hire too fast and fire too slow.

Not only do you want to avoid hiring someone too quickly, but a five-step interview process gives you the opportunity to have different people from different areas of the church evaluate and assess your new candidate.

Before you spend time talking to candidates, we recommend you first use a form to get basic information from them and see if you’d like to continue. You don’t want to talk to everyone interested in the job, so use some questions to pre-screen candidates. Here are a few questions we recommend:

What compelled you to apply for the position?
What sticks out to you about our church and this opportunity?
What are you currently learning?
What are you good at?
Where do you currently work and what do you do?
What do you love about your job? What do you not love about it?
What are you looking for in your next job?

The pre-screening questions are intentionally simple, but you can certainly ask deeper questions as well. You could ask questions like:

Tell me about the last conflict you had. What was the outcome and where does that relationship stand today?

Has there ever been a time where you had a really difficult volunteer or someone under you that wasn’t submitting to your leadership? How did you handle that situation?

Do you have a volunteer or team member that you’re really proud of when it comes to their growth? What happened and how did you disciple them?

Have you ever had to let a team member go? What did that process look like?

These questions will provide you the opportunity to get to know more than just professional information about your potential hire, but to see what kind of person they are, what their personality is like, and you’ll get to know them on a deeper level. You’ll find that people’s answers can be revealing into both what type of person they are and what they would be like in their role.

Once you find someone you want to move forward with, continue to the first interview.

The purpose of this interview is to determine if you want to seriously consider the person for this role.

Your main goal during this interview: Ask the same questions to each candidate. Stay on track and push for specific examples. It’s okay to do this over a call, but aim to do this interview in person. Here are some questions you’ll want to ask during this interview:

What are your ministry goals?
What are you really good at professionally? (Look for 8-12 positive traits at a time where they were decisive.)
What are you not good at or not interested in doing professionally?
Who were your last five bosses and how would they each rate your performance on a 1-10 scale?

Really delve into these questions. If someone says, “I just want to help people:’ to answer the career goals question, continue to push. That’s not a good enough answer. If they give shallow or expected answers, keep digging. You’re looking for specifics.

Once you feel that you are seriously considering your candidate as a future hire, you’re ready to move on to the second interview.

People are not their past, but past behavior is most often the best predictor of future performance. If you want to know how someone may perform in a role (i.e. as a worship pastor), look at how they’ve performed in their last role.

Your main goal during this interview:

For each of your candidate’s prior jobs, ask these questions:
What were you hired to do?

What accomplishments are you most proud of? Exceptional people tend to talk about outcomes connected to expectations. Mediocre people talk about events, people, or job aspects not related to results.
What were some low points during that job?

Who were the people you worked with? Further questions here may be: What was it like to work with your boss? What will they say is your biggest strength or weakness? How would you rate the team you inherited? What changes did you make? Did you hire or fire anyone? How would you rate the team when you left?
Why did you leave that job?

Make sure to go through this series of questions for every chapter or story of their life. Walk through career history chronologically. This could take up to 2 to 3 hours.

You’re not just trying to determine what you think your potential hire will do, but what they have done in similar environments with similar objectives. Here’s a short guide of how you’ll want this interview to go.
Let your candidate know “the purpose of this interview is to talk about
(a specific outcome or competency).

For your worship pastor position, it might be “building a team of volunteer musicians:’
What are your biggest accomplishments in this area during your career?
What are your insights into your biggest mistakes and lessons learned in this area?

You’ll really want to reiterate those expectations here of what you expect from your worship pastor and gauge the strengths and weaknesses of your potential hire.

Once you have a strong candidate in mind, it’s time to talk to their previous boss and/or co-workers.

Your main goal during this interview:

INTERVIEW YOUR CANDIDATE’S REFERENCES
Do not skip this step.

You’re not looking for references to give generic feedback or have someone simply check a box. We include this as one of the interviews, because we think you should actually interview the person giving the reference.

Here are specific questions you may want to ask during this interview:
In what context did you work with this person?
What were the candidate’s biggest strengths?
What were the candidate’s biggest areas for improvement back then?
How would you rate his or her overall performance in that job on a 1-10 scale? What about his/her performance causes you to give them that rating?

The candidate mentioned that he/she struggled with . Can you tell me more about that?

This interview is important because anyone can talk themselves up. You want an un-biased outlook on how your potential hire has done in former roles. You don’t have to imagine what they would be like – you can talk to people who actually worked with them. This is another great opportunity to gauge exactly what your potential worship pastor is like and how they would perform.

Other team members and spouses should be involved in this step and it should happen in a casual setting.

Remember that every person you hire adds to your team culture. Your culture will heavily influence them, but this certainly goes both ways. There are few ways that will disrupt a healthy leadership culture like having the wrong person at the table.

You don’t have to be best friends with everyone that works at your church, but it shouldn’t be awkward to hang out with them. Take them to dinner, or dessert. Go to a baseball game. Hang out at a cookout. Find something you have in common and do it outside of the office together and/or get other people involved.

Another great tool you can use here is the “spouse test.”
This is a great way to go about really getting to know your candidate. To go through with this, you’ll want to request the presence of your potential hire’s spouse during an interview. This could be in person or via video chat. Do this in the early stages of the interview process and pay attention to how the candidate’s spouse is reacting to your candidate’s answers.

His/her body language will clue you in to the candidate’s response. Is she smiling and nodding her head as she listens to her husband speak? Or does he have a blank stare on his face like the candidate is giving you an answer they think you want to hear? This test can go a long way.
While these interviews and questions should stay the same every time you go through this process, you can involve different people in different phases. If you’re bringing a candidate in from out of town, you should feel free to do interview 2 and 3 on the same day. Just try to involve people and change up the environment.

You’ve done all the hard work of creating a job profile, clarifying the roles and responsibilities and making sure your new worship pastor is a great fit for the team.

Now it’s time to make the official offer, get them set up for success, and truly integrate your new leader into the culture of your church.

When it comes to bringing on a new employee, hiring is just half the battle. Their first 90 days on the job are critical to everyone’s success and happiness. That’s why having an onboarding process is so important. You might have guessed by now that you want to create an onboarding process to use every time you bring someone on to the team.

This is also the time to reiterate expectations to your new hire, not to micro-manage your new worship pastor, but so they are not thrown into the deep end. Make sure to create clarity so your worship pastor knows what they’re supposed to be doing.

Pastors are busy. One minute you’re writing a sermon, the next minute you’re meeting with someone in need, and the next you’re leading a meeting. With all the urgent things on your plate, it’s no wonder there’s a struggle to find the time to do some of the important things.

Like developing your staff. Most pastors know leadership development is important, but few of us actually find the time to actually do it. Most pastors realize more leaders need to step up and lead at a higher level.

Once you’ve hired and integrated your new worship pastor, the job continues. In a way, this part of the process is never complete and it applies to everyone on your team, not just your newest staff member.

The healthiest church cultures value continued growth and training. Since people drift to complexity, it’s up to the leader to continually cast clarity. Since all of us fall back into comfortable patterns, we need opportunities to grow and be challenged in our thinking.

The above article, “Hire The Right Worship Pastor” was excerpted from www.churchfuel.com.

The material is copyrighted and should not be reprinted under any other name or author. However, this material may be freely used for personal study or research purposes.

This article may not be written by an Apostolic author, but it contains many excellent principles and concepts that can be adapted to most churches. As the old saying goes, “Eat the meat. Throw away the bones.”

Posted in AIS File Library, JD - Job Descriptions, MU - Music Ministry, MUGE - Music Ministry, MUMA - Music Management0 Comments

Why You Should Use Hymns

Why You Should Use Hymns
Don Chapman

This year HymnCharts will be 15 years old! I started the website soon after I became a church music director for the first time. As most of you have found, mixing hymns with contemporary worship songs is quite a challenge and back then resources were nonexistent.

The young church where I was serving had a praise band and contemporary music, yet I was getting requests for hymns (or perhaps “demands” would be a better word – you know how it is!) I arranged “All Hail the Power” for the band one Sunday and it was a smash (download this arrangement for free.) A mid twenties year old guitarist in the band wondered where I found this “great new praise song” and an older lady came up to me and was thrilled to hear the old hymn.

These days many worship leaders believe they’re too hip or cool to include hymns in their cutting edge praise sets. It’s their loss – and their congregation’s.

In her epic book Worship Evangelism, Sally Morgenthaler reinforces what I’ve believed all along – the average person in your congregation, even the unchurched, are far less “hip” than the worship leader. They may love the new worship songs but they also love the old hymns (although they don’t want to hear them with pipe organs.) I quote from her book:

In a recent study, two-thirds of the unchurched said they would prefer to come back to an “informal” church experience. What exactly an “informal experience” entails was not clear. Yet 47 percent of those surveyed also indicated that they would like to sing some traditional hymns. (Note: This does not necessarily mean they want to sing them in a “traditional way.”)

Another study found that while only 21 percent of all Americans would choose churches that offer an exclusive diet of traditional hymns, 65 percent prefer churches that provide a mix of traditional and contemporary music (music that has been composed in the last ten to twenty years). Evidently the American public – including its vast unchurched sector – does not support a wholesale abandonment of religious trappings.

In A Generation of Seekers, a boomer pastor speaks of the powerful emotions that are often triggered when boomers return to church and intersect with certain traditional elements in worship:

Many of my age group talk about coming to church, and they cry through the service- [especially when they listen to] the hymns, they are just unraveled. And these are people who haven’t come to church in years- It’s empowering- a real deep sense of coming home again- of something that was missing and then reaching some real deep places that people weren’t even aware of.

So just how can you combine hymns with worship music? The problem is that hymns out of a hymnal don’t have the same “feel” as the contemporary songs.

If you only have hymnal versions of hymns, don’t mix these with your praise music. Putting a hymnal hymn in the middle of your set will disrupt the flow – the styles are too different. Instead, isolate them as a call to worship, a benediction or offertory.

To effectively blend hymns with praise songs you’ll need a contemporary hymn arrangement. My goal is for such a seamless transition from a praise song to a hymn that the congregation doesn’t even realize they’ve shifted lyrical centuries.

The best contemporary hymn arrangements:

-lower the key: SATB hymnal hymns have a wide vocal range with high sopranos and low basses. Modern music harmony is tight and mid-ranged.

-are put in guitar friendly keys like D, E and G. I’m also hearing more and more praise songs in B.

-keep the melodies intact. I cringe when arrangers jazz up a hymn melody to make it “cooler.” The whole point to a contemporary hymn arrangement is to bring the generations together.

Adding syncopations to traditional melodies makes for a tongue tied congregation. Completely new melodies are great, however, as they give a breath of fresh air to ancient texts, as are traditional hymns with added choruses like Tomlin’s “The Wonderful Cross.”

Bottom Line: Mix Hillsong United with Isaac Watts and you’ll hit a home run.

The above article, “Why You Should Use Hymns” was written by Don Chapman. The article was excerpted from www.hymncharts.com.

The material is copyrighted and should not be reprinted under any other name or author. However, this material may be freely used for personal study or research purposes.

This article may not be written by an Apostolic author, but it contains many excellent principles and concepts that can be adapted to most churches. As the old saying goes, “Eat the meat. Throw away the bones.”

Posted in AIS CD - Featured Stories0 Comments

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