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Acts 2,9 Paul Defends Himself at Caesarea

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TEXT: Acts 24, 25 & 26.

  1. STANDING BEFORE KINGS:

The Lord had told Ananias that Paul was a chosen vessel to bear the name of Jesus before the

Gentiles, the kings, and the children of Israel. In this lesson we study about Paul bearing the

name of Jesus before two governors and one king. Later he stands before the emperor at Rome.

  1. FELIX:

Felix was liberated from slavery by Claudius by whom he was appointed procurator of

Judea. He ruled the province in a mean, cruel and profligate manner. His period of office

was full of troubles and sedition. The wife of Felix was Drusilla, daughter of Herod

Agrippa I.

  1. FESTUS:

He was the successor of Felix as governor of Judea. Nero appointed him probably in the

autumn of the year 60 A.D. He died probably in the summer of 62 A.D. having ruled the

province less than two years.

  1. KING AGRIPPA:

Herod Agrippa II was the son of Herod Agrippa I. He was in Rome at the time of the death

of his father A.D. 44. The relation in which he stood to his sister, Bernice, was the cause of

much suspicion. The appearance of Paul before Agrippa tells much about his character.

The pomp with which the king came into the audience chamber and the cold irony with

which he met the impassioned words of the Apostle are both characteristic traits of this

man.

  1. PAUL DEFENDS HIMSELF BEFORE FELIX:
  2. PAUL SENT TO FELIX:

At Jerusalem a plot was discovered that forty men had conspired to kill Paul. The captain,

Claudius Lysias, wrote Governor Felix at Caesarea a letter and sent Paul to him guarded by

two centurions, two hundred soldiers, seventy horsemen, and two hundred spearmen. Paul

was allowed to ride all the way.

Felix sent to Jerusalem for the accusers of Paul and after five days they arrived in Caesarea.

  1. THE ACCUSATION AGAINST PAUL:

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